Skip to content

The Greenhorn Chronicles 16: Wes Schild on Expense, Show Jumping’s Appeal, and the Industry (2)

2022-08-22

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interviewer: Scott Douglas Jacobsen

Numbering: Issue 30.E, Idea: Outliers & Outsiders (25)

Place of Publication: Langley, British Columbia, Canada

Title: In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal

Web Domain: http://www.in-sightpublishing.com

Individual Publication Date: August 22, 2022

Issue Publication Date: September 1, 2022

Name of Publisher: In-Sight Publishing

Frequency: Three Times Per Year

Words: 1,852

ISSN 2369-6885

Abstract

Wes is a Professional Trainer & Coach for Riverlands Equestrian Centre. He completed an internship at Landgestuet Celle (Hanovarian State Stud) in Adelheidsdorf, Germany. He has worked as a professional rider for McLean Reitsport in Tonisvorst. He has worked in Wellington, Florida for Alexandra Duncan and trained with Juan Matute Sr. He discusses: economic barriers; the demographics per discipline; new rider; people will enter into the industry and then drop out; the industry now in Canada; quality and cleanliness and orderliness of facilities; geldings and mares get 15×15 stalls and stallions get 15×20 stalls; boarding and room for a horse; base costs for improved quality of life; training with various individuals within the industry; a session; tack up; and to Riverlands for a lesson.

Keywords: Canada, Dressage, Greenhorn Chronicles, Riverlands Equestrian Centre, Wes Schild.

The Greenhorn Chronicles 16: Wes Schild on Expense, Show Jumping’s Appeal, and the Industry (2)

*Please see the footnotes, bibliography, and citations after the interview.*

*Interview conducted December 30, 2021.*

Scott Douglas Jacobsen: Are there economic barriers? Although, I don’t know if that’s necessarily true because the demographics note the incomes of people who ride horses generally are about middle class. They are ordinary people in general. But getting into the industry, getting a horse, getting equipment, paying for boarding for the first little bit, etc. is that a barrier at the outset for getting into the industry?

Wes Schild[1],[2]: I think it depends on when you’re probably getting into the industry; I think it might be a little bit tougher as a child or a young teen to get into it just because there is a greater expense. Then again if you were just to go and be on some other sports team, there’s a lot more to owning a horse. Then you have to have someone that can help care for it or you have to board it out. So, I think that also slows down, why people don’t do it.

Jacobsen: How do you find the demographics per discipline within the equine – dressage versus jumping versus hunting, etc.? What tends to attract the most participants in Canada?

Schild: I would probably say jumping definitely would be your number one.

Jacobsen: What might be the reason for that?

Schild: I think if you go from people that are getting into it at a younger age. Show jumping has more appeal to it. For someone that’s just standing back and watching it; you get the idea of what’s going on. You see that someone’s riding the horse. They get to gallop the course. They’re jumping fences. It looks fun. It’s exciting. Whereas if you are looking back from a distance, again, and watching a very basic dressage test happen, you might not understand exactly what’s happening. So, someone to see the jumping is definitely more interesting. So, I think that’s where people lean to first; they want to get into jumping first. And then, maybe, once they’re in riding for a while and have a better understanding of it, they start to look to dressage because they understand that actually dressage is the basics to all riding. They need a really good solid foundation in their flat work and in their dressage work to be an excellent jumper. And then, of course, you would find out that if you’re riding with someone reputable or your trainer. Those top riders are all working on good flat work and dressage to make these top jumping horses.

Jacobsen: How long does it take for a horse to become acquainted and comfortable with a new rider?

Schild: I always say to my clients here when I’ve helped them in the past look for a new riding horse and there’s a new partnership being started up; I always say about a year. It takes a while for you to learn the horse and how they think and how they act and how they react to different situations. It’s a partnership, so it’s about building trust with your new partner and that that takes time and patience and help from a coach or a trainer.

Jacobsen: Is there a period at which people will enter into the industry and then drop out? So, hypothetically, a young teenager, parents put them into some equestrian discipline. They have a horse. They train, take part in competitions or some casual events for five years, and then they drop it at 17. What is a common scenario one would expect in a decent hunk of the equestrian world in Canada?

Schild: I would say that’s right. I would say if you were to look at a lot of the young riders that, maybe, ride from the time they’re 10 to 18 or whatever; they do that while they’re in high school and have the time, the ability, and, probably, their parents support, hopefully, to be able to do the sport. I would say around that age is when you start to see people fizzle out of it. I think it’s mostly because they’re going off to start post-secondary education. Or they need to start working full-time. They just can’t afford to do both things. There’s not enough time to do both things. So, I would say that’s probably when most fizzle out of the sport, but I would also say I know quite a few who have stopped riding then, and then maybe go on to post-secondary education, and then start a family, or whatever, and then return to riding in their early 30s, and continue on.

Jacobsen: How many people are in the industry now in Canada?

Schild: That’s a good question. I don’t actually know the answer.

Jacobsen: Okay. How important are quality and cleanliness and orderliness of facilities for proper equine activities?

Schild: Well, I would say it’s very important. That’s actually one of the biggest things that I took away from being in Europe. Some of the facilities that you go to over there are almost like military. They expect very high standards of cleanliness and respect and order for horses and riders. And here at our facility, I do the same; I make sure that everything’s very clean and organized. Everything’s very proper because it makes for running the business and the horses and the clients and everything just such a way nicer atmosphere to come to work every day when everything has a place and is organized. People know where things are; and it makes the day just run that much smoother.

Jacobsen: Your stalls are noted as 15×15 and 15×20. 15×20 for the stallions. So, geldings and mares get 15×15 stalls and stallions get 15×20 stalls. Why do the stallions get slightly bigger stalls?

Schild: There’s really not a huge reason why here we made them a little bit bigger. It’s only because stallions sometimes tend to be inside a little bit longer than you would like a mare-stallion for turnout purposes anyways. Luckily at our facility, we have quite a few paddocks that are built correctly and tall enough and are safe enough to put stallions out in so that there is no risk of them hurting themselves or getting out and trying to get to another horse. But the person who designed our facility wanted to make those stallion stalls just a little bit bigger because, like I said, if you have times where the stallions might not be able to go outside, it’s nice for them to have a big stall inside that they can move around and they’re quite comfortable in.

Jacobsen: For boarding and room for a horse, so gelding, stallion, to mare, where most people have a small ranch to the upper echelons of standards of care in Canada or even Europe, what is the range of costs people want to be looking at here?

Schild: Definitely out in the West coast, now, you’re looking roughly most places now about 1,000 dollars a month for a stall, and then that can go up or down depending on the facility and what the facility offers and what’s included in your board. If you go down to – let’s say – Florida, for example, I know lots of facilities down there that you’re looking probably closer to like 1,800 a month to 2,000 a month. That’s, of course, done in US dollars, but I would say at most good facilities now you’re looking around a 1,000 dollars a month.

Jacobsen: What can be added onto those base costs for improved quality of life for the horse?

Schild: So, for example, at our facility, some of the add-ons, there would be different types of quality of hay that you can get. With your board, you have just local grass type hay that we grow here on the farm, but then some horses need more protein or more energy in their diet. So, we also can bring in straight alfalfa. We have timothy, so that would be an extra cost. We have an automatic horse walker, which is really good for horses that need rehabilitation. Or we use it as a strength and exercise program every morning. So, all my competition horses go on the walker before they go to their turnout fields, so that would be an extra cost monthly. Those would be some of the type of things some facilities have. Treadmills or water treadmills, again, that would be an extra charge that would add on. Also, we have a massage therapist and chiropractor that come monthly. So, if that’s something that you want done for your horse, that’s just an extra add-on to your monthly bill here, and then they get massaged. They get a chiropractor treatment done.

Jacobsen: How much is training with various individuals within the industry? So, they have the basic level of training to become a coach to training with someone who has been on the national Olympic team for a particular country?.

Schild: You mean for a lesson price wise?

Jacobsen: Certainly.

Schild: Again, it totally depends on who you’re training with; a lower-level coach, you’re, probably, looking for around 75 dollars for a session. Then upper level stuff, you’re probably looking somewhere around 200 dollars for a session.

Jacobsen: For a session, how long does that last?

Schild: Generally, 45 minutes to an hour.

Jacobsen: Okay. Does this include tack up?

Schild: No, if you are having a session, your session begins at, let’s say, three o’clock. You’d be expected to be tacked up and ready to ride for three o’clock, and then you would ride with your coach from 3:00 to 3:45.

Jacobsen: So, let’s say, someone comes to Riverlands for a lesson, what will be a standard pre-lesson lesson and post-lesson series of procedures for them?

Schild: Well, for most people that come for lessons here, they have their horse already here, so they’re in a program with me. They would come. They would have their lesson time. They would get their horse tacked up and ready to ride. They would go into the indoor or the outdoor riding arena and warm up for probably 5-10 minutes before I come into the arena, and then we normally would have probably a five-minute little chat about what they’re feeling, what they want to work on, if they have any questions or concerns, and then we go into more of a detailed warm-up where I have eyes on them and the horse. We work through the warmup. Then we go into more of what I call the work for the day or the competition riding. So, we figure out what we’re going to work on, and we put the horse through some type of lesson plan and then there’s always breaks in that, of course, to give the horse time to recover and recuperate. Then we would do the cool down session and we always end the lesson with thoughts on how the lesson went; the good, the bad, and what we need to work on and their takeaway, their homework, for whatever. The next couple days until I see them again.

Footnotes

[1] Professional Trainer & Coach, Riverland Equestrian Centre.

[2] Individual Publication Date: August 22, 2022: http://www.in-sightpublishing.com/schild-2; Full Issue Publication Date: September 1, 2022: https://in-sightpublishing.com/insight-issues/.

Image Credit: Wes Schild.

Citations

American Medical Association (AMA): Jacobsen S. The Greenhorn Chronicles 16: Wes Schild on Expense, Show Jumping’s Appeal, and the Industry (2)[Online]. August 2022; 30(E). Available from: http://www.in-sightpublishing.com/schild-2.

American Psychological Association (APA, 6th Edition, 2010): Jacobsen, S.D. (2022, August 22). The Greenhorn Chronicles 16: Wes Schild on Expense, Show Jumping’s Appeal, and the Industry (2). Retrieved from http://www.in-sightpublishing.com/schild-2.

Brazilian National Standards (ABNT): JACOBSEN, S. The Greenhorn Chronicles 16: Wes Schild on Expense, Show Jumping’s Appeal, and the Industry (2). In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 30.E, August. 2022. <http://www.in-sightpublishing.com/schild-2>.

Chicago/Turabian, Author-Date (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott. 2022. “The Greenhorn Chronicles 16: Wes Schild on Expense, Show Jumping’s Appeal, and the Industry (2).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 30.E. http://www.in-sightpublishing.com/schild-2.

Chicago/Turabian, Humanities (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott “The Greenhorn Chronicles 16: Wes Schild on Expense, Show Jumping’s Appeal, and the Industry (2).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 30.E (August 2022). http://www.in-sightpublishing.com/schild-2.

Harvard: Jacobsen, S. 2022, ‘The Greenhorn Chronicles 16: Wes Schild on Expense, Show Jumping’s Appeal, and the Industry (2)’, In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 30.E. Available from: <http://www.in-sightpublishing.com/schild-2>.

Harvard, Australian: Jacobsen, S. 2022, ‘The Greenhorn Chronicles 16: Wes Schild on Expense, Show Jumping’s Appeal, and the Industry (2)’, In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 30.E., http://www.in-sightpublishing.com/schild-2.

Modern Language Association (MLA, 7th Edition, 2009): Scott D. Jacobsen. “The Greenhorn Chronicles 16: Wes Schild on Expense, Show Jumping’s Appeal, and the Industry (2).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 30.E (2022): August. 2022. Web. <http://www.in-sightpublishing.com/schild-2>.

Vancouver/ICMJE: Jacobsen S. The Greenhorn Chronicles 16: Wes Schild on Expense, Show Jumping’s Appeal, and the Industry (2)[Internet]. (2022, August 30(E). Available from: http://www.in-sightpublishing.com/schild-2.

License

In-Sight Publishing by Scott Douglas Jacobsen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Based on a work at www.in-sightpublishing.com.

Copyright

© Scott Douglas Jacobsen and In-Sight Publishing 2012–Present. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Scott Douglas Jacobsen, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. All interviewees and authors co-copyright their material and can disseminate for their independent purposes.

Leave a Comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: