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Conversation with Entemake Aman (阿曼) on Chinese Education: Member, OlympIQ Society (2)

2022-02-15

Interviewer: Scott Douglas Jacobsen

Numbering: Issue 29.A, Idea: Outliers & Outsiders (24)

Place of Publication: Langley, British Columbia, Canada

Title: In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal

Web Domain: http://www.in-sightjournal.com

Individual Publication Date: February 1, 2022

Issue Publication Date: May 1, 2022

Name of Publisher: In-Sight Publishing

Frequency: Three Times Per Year

Words: 805

ISSN 2369-6885

Abstract

Entemake Aman ( 阿曼 ) claims an IQ of 180 (SD15) with membership in OlympIQ. With this, he claims one to be of the people with highest IQ in the world. He was born in Xinjiang, China. He believes IQ is innate and genius refers to people with IQ above 160 (SD15). Einstein’s IQ is estimated at 160. Aman thinks genius needs to be cultivated from an early age, and that he needs to make achievements in the fields he is interested in, such as physics, mathematics, computer and philosophy, and should work hard to give full play to his talent. He discusses: Chinese culture’s view of IQ; the main people in the high-IQ culture of China; the highest IQs in China known; more active in China’s IQ circle; Chinese education competitiveness; Chinese education; students’ view China’s educational system; the outcome for students who go through China’s educational system; the educational system in China; different students of different IQs treated in China’s educational system; the gifted and talented; Chinese child prodigies; the Chinese educational system improve; older high-IQ students mentor younger high-IQ students.

Keywords: Entemake Aman, intelligence, IQ, OlympIQ Society.

Conversation with Entemake Aman (阿曼) on Chinese Education: Member, OlympIQ Society (2)

*Please see the footnotes, bibliography, and citation style listing after the interview.*

Scott Douglas Jacobsen: What is Chinese culture’s view of IQ?

Entemake Aman (阿曼)[1],[2]*: Only a few people in China pay attention to IQ. Many people generally believe that good learning means high IQ. Mensa has stopped testing people in China.

Jacobsen: Who are some of the main people in the high-IQ culture of China?

Aman: Wayne Zhang, Qiao Han Sheng and other olympiq members. I estimate that there are 10 people with IQ over 175 in China.

Jacobsen: What are the high-IQ societies in China?

Aman: Shen Han’s IQ Society (threshold is 130 sd15) and Mensa China. Sheng Han currently has about 4500 members. Mensa China has 800 members. Mensa is a supervised test and Sheng Han is an unsupervised test. Some of China’s high scores are unreliable. In China, the answers of slseii, slse48 and numerus have been leaked. Therefore, I suggest Jonathan Wai pay attention to China’s slse scores.

Jacobsen: Who have the highest IQs in China known?

Aman: Wen-chin su. My IQ is among the top three in China.

Jacobsen: What societies are more active in China’s IQ circle?

Aman: Sheng Han high IQ Association and Mensa China are the most active.

Jacobsen: Is Chinese education competitive?

Aman: Because China has a population of 1.4 billion, it is very competitive. We have to study hard for 12 years before we can enter a good university.

Jacobsen: How is Chinese education built?

Aman: China’s education is exam oriented education for the purpose of college entrance examination. Our college entrance examination is divided into science and liberal arts. We all take Chinese, mathematics and English. Science tests physics, chemistry and biology. Liberal arts exam politics, history and geography. The full score is 750.

Jacobsen: How do students view China’s educational system?

Aman: In China, the college entrance examination is the most fair examination, and it is basically the only chance for ordinary students to change their fate. But it’s hard.

Jacobsen: What is the outcome for students who go through China’s educational system?

Aman: Students who work hard can be admitted to a good university. I think what the college entrance examination needs most is good teachers. If the middle school entrance examination is not good, students will not be able to enter key middle schools, so the teaching teachers will not be very good, and you may not be able to enter a good university. Therefore, it is very important to enter key middle schools in China. Key middle schools have good teachers to teach you.

Jacobsen: How is IQ used in the educational system in China if at all?

Aman: In China, few people pay attention to IQ unless they are interested in high IQ. In China, physics and mathematics may need an IQ of 120 (SD = 15). Other subjects need to study hard and have good teachers (good teachers are the most important).

Jacobsen: How are different students of different IQs treated in China’s educational system?

Aman: Schools pay little attention to students’ IQ. Anyway, whether we can enter a good high school in China and meet good teachers is the most important. In a good high school, you can have the opportunity to participate in competitions, such as mathematics and physics.. If your IQ reaches 120 (SD = 15) and you meet a good teacher, you have a high probability of being admitted to a good university.

Jacobsen: How are the gifted and talented treated in the Chinese educational system?

Aman: If you are a genius in physics or mathematics. You can participate in the competition, then you can be escorted to Tsinghua and Peking University. Of course, the premise is that your high school is a key high school. I don’t think China’s education system is suitable for talents with IQ above 140 (sd15).

Jacobsen: What happens to Chinese child prodigies in adulthood after going through the Chinese educational system?

Aman: For those prodigies with IQ greater than 140, if they do not enter a good high school and receive good teachers, they will probably not enter a good university. Therefore, whether a child prodigy with an IQ greater than 140 can become a talent requires good high school and hard study.

Jacobsen: How could the Chinese educational system improve?

Aman: The current education system only needs an IQ of 120 (sd15) and can be admitted to a good university through hard study. China has a population of 1.4 billion. I find it difficult to change China’s education system.

Jacobsen: How can older high-IQ students mentor younger high-IQ students to help them?

Aman:  Study hard from Grade 7. Whether you can enter a good high school is an important condition for you to enter a good university. After entering a good high school, try to participate in math and physics competitions as much as possible.

Appendix I: Footnotes

[1] Member, OlympIQ Society; Member, Mensa International.

[2] Individual Publication Date: February 15, 2022: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/aman-2; Full Issue Publication Date: May 1, 2022: https://in-sightjournal.com/insight-issues/.

*High range testing (HRT) should be taken with honest skepticism grounded in the limited empirical development of the field at present, even in spite of honest and sincere efforts. If a higher general intelligence score, then the greater the variability in, and margin of error in, the general intelligence scores because of the greater rarity in the population.

Appendix II: Citation Style Listing

American Medical Association (AMA): Jacobsen S. Conversation with Entemake Aman (阿曼) on Chinese Education: Member, OlympIQ Society (2)[Online]. February 2022; 29(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/aman-2.

American Psychological Association (APA, 6th Edition, 2010): Jacobsen, S.D. (2022, February 15). Conversation with Entemake Aman (阿曼) on Chinese Education: Member, OlympIQ Society (2). Retrieved from http://www.in-sightjournal.com/aman-2.

Brazilian National Standards (ABNT): JACOBSEN, S. Conversation with Entemake Aman (阿曼) on Chinese Education: Member, OlympIQ Society (2). In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 29.A, February. 2022. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/aman-2>.

Chicago/Turabian, Author-Date (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott. 2022. “Conversation with Entemake Aman (阿曼) on Chinese Education: Member, OlympIQ Society (2).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 29.A. http://www.in-sightjournal.com/aman-2.

Chicago/Turabian, Humanities (16th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott “Conversation with Entemake Aman (阿曼) on Chinese Education: Member, OlympIQ Society (2).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. 29.A (February 2022). http://www.in-sightjournal.com/aman-2.

Harvard: Jacobsen, S. 2022, ‘Conversation with Entemake Aman (阿曼) on Chinese Education: Member, OlympIQ Society (2)’In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 29.A. Available from: <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/aman-2>.

Harvard, Australian: Jacobsen, S. 2022, ‘Conversation with Entemake Aman (阿曼) on Chinese Education: Member, OlympIQ Society (2)’In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 29.A., http://www.in-sightjournal.com/aman-2.

Modern Language Association (MLA, 7th Edition, 2009): Scott D. Jacobsen. “Conversation with Entemake Aman (阿曼) on Chinese Education: Member, OlympIQ Society (2).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 29.A (2022): February. 2022. Web. <http://www.in-sightjournal.com/aman-2>.

Vancouver/ICMJE: Jacobsen S. Conversation with Entemake Aman (阿曼) on Chinese Education: Member, OlympIQ Society (2)[Internet]. (2022, February 29(A). Available from: http://www.in-sightjournal.com/aman-2.

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