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Conversation with Mizuki Tomaiwa on Life, Work, and Views: Member, OLYMPIQ Society (1)

2022-11-08

Publisher: In-Sight Publishing

Publisher Founding: September 1, 2014

Web Domain: http://www.in-sightpublishing.com 

Location: Fort Langley, Township of Langley, British Columbia, Canada

Journal: In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal

Journal Founding: August 2, 2012

Frequency: Three (3) Times Per Year

Review Status: Non-Peer-Reviewed

Access: Electronic/Digital & Open Access

Fees: None (Free)

Volume Numbering: 11

Issue Numbering: 1

Section: A

Theme Type: Idea

Theme Premise: “Outliers and Outsiders”

Theme Part: 26

Formal Sub-Theme: None

Individual Publication Date: November 8, 2022

Issue Publication Date: January 1, 2023

Author(s): Scott Douglas Jacobsen

Interviewer(s): Scott Douglas Jacobsen

Interviewee(s): Mizuki Tomaiwa

Word Count: 976

Image Credit: None.

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN): 2369-6885

*Please see the footnotes, bibliography, and citations, after the interview.*

Abstract

Mizuki Tomaiwa was born in 2000 in Japan. She is an American college student with an interest in the biomedical field, psychiatry, and gifted education. She respects Leonardo da Vinci, Bach, Liszt, and her parents. She earned an I.Q. of 183+ (S.D. 16) on the Cattell CFIT. Tomaiwa discusses: growing up; extended self; family background; youth with friends; education; purpose of intelligence tests; high intelligence; extreme reactions to geniuses; greatest geniuses; genius and a profoundly gifted person; necessities for genius or the definition of genius; work experiences and jobs held; job path; myths of the gifted; God; science; tests taken and scores earned; range of the scores; ethical philosophy; political philosophy; metaphysics; worldview; meaning in life; source of meaning; afterlife; life; and love.

Keywords: Bach, Cattell CFIT, God, intelligence tests, IQ, Japan, Leonardo da Vinci, Liszt, Mizuki Tomaiwa, OLYMPIQ Society.

Conversation with Mizuki Tomaiwa on Life, Work, and Views: Member, OLYMPIQ Society (1)

Scott Douglas Jacobsen: When you were growing up, what were some of the prominent family stories being told over time?

Mizuki Tomaiwa: When I was younger, I often disagreed with other classmates.

But my father was always fair in discussing my opinion versus other opinions. My mother affirmed me.

Jacobsen: Have these stories helped provide a sense of an extended self or a sense of the family legacy?

Tomaiwa: They will definitely be useful in the near future.

Jacobsen: What was the family background, e.g., geography, culture, language, and religion or lack thereof?

Tomaiwa: My family, including myself, are Buddhists, but I can’t say that our faith is strong. We enjoy Halloween and Christmas.

As for geography, our house is surrounded by nature, and we often hear the singing of the Japanese bush warbler.

The language in the home is Japanese. I use English at school.

Jacobsen: How was the experience with peers and schoolmates as a child and an adolescent?

Tomaiwa: Unfortunately, my adolescence was a sad one. 

I was constantly trying to fit in with others and had to suppress my outpouring of curiosity. Every time I tried to match with my classmates, my heart was worn out.

I had no schoolmates with whom I could talk. I always felt alone.

In Japanese schools, everyone has to be the same. Talent and individuality tend to be unwelcome. However, according to Japan’s Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, more than now, expert discussions are being held to accommodate individual abilities, such as math and other skills.

Jacobsen: What have been some professional certifications, qualifications, and trainings earned by you?

Tomaiwa: I have a certificate of English proficiency in Japan.

And I graduated from ESL at Langara College in Canada. This is the English proficiency equivalent to university entrance.

Jacobsen: What is the purpose of intelligence tests to you?

Tomaiwa: I occasionally come across a test that is exciting to solve.

Jacobsen: When was high intelligence discovered for you?

Tomaiwa: Around February 2021.

Jacobsen: When you think of the ways in which the geniuses of the past have either been mocked, vilified, and condemned if not killed, or praised, flattered, platformed, and revered, what seems like the reason for the extreme reactions to and treatment of geniuses? Many alive today seem camera shy – many, not all.

Tomaiwa: The frog in the well that knows the blue sky tries to get out.

The one without knowledge is the one who scoffs at it.

Jacobsen: Who seems like the greatest geniuses in history to you?

Tomaiwa: Leonardo da Vinci.

Jacobsen: What differentiates a genius from a profoundly intelligent person?

Tomaiwa: Deep love for all things.

And sometimes creative.

Jacobsen: Is profound intelligence necessary for genius?

Tomaiwa: I believe that geniuses connect those dots in the future by learning a wide range of fields through intelligence. Many dots make ideas creative.

Jacobsen: What have been some work experiences and jobs held by you?

Tomaiwa: Work as a tutor teaching math, English, science, Japanese, and social studies.

Work taking care of children after school.

Jacobsen: Why pursue this particular job path?

Tomaiwa: For several reasons, being in contact with children reminds me of my childhood.

Jacobsen: What are some of the more important aspects of the idea of the gifted and geniuses? Those myths that pervade the cultures of the world. What are those myths? What truths dispel them?

Tomaiwa: It is a myth that geniuses can do anything and rarely make mistakes.

All people have different orientations and interests. 

Jacobsen: Any thoughts on the God concept or gods idea and philosophy, theology, and religion?

Tomaiwa: Just as people like beautiful flowers, God also likes people with beautiful souls, so those who have them leave this world early.

Jacobsen: How much does science play into the worldview for you?

Tomaiwa: For me, it is a thought process.

The process of questioning, trial and error, and then coming up with an answer is important to me.

Jacobsen: What have been some of the tests taken and scores earned (with standard deviations) for you?

Tomaiwa: Cattell CFIT (sd 16) 183+.

Jacobsen: What ethical philosophy makes some sense, even the most workable sense to you?

Tomaiwa: Remember to be grateful for the services you receive, even if you have to pay for them.

Jacobsen: What social philosophy makes some sense, even the most workable sense to you?

Tomaiwa: History is driven by people’s anger and frustration.

Jacobsen: What political philosophy makes some sense, even the most workable sense to you?

Tomaiwa: Governments that do not invest in education will not grow.

Jacobsen: What metaphysics makes some sense to you, even the most workable sense to you?

Tomaiwa: No study is considered valuable from the start. It is important to keep exploring.

Jacobsen: What worldview-encompassing philosophical system makes some sense, even the most workable sense to you?

Tomaiwa: Every person I’ve met has been a teacher in my life.

Jacobsen: What provides meaning in life for you?

Tomaiwa: Life is challenging, but that is what makes it meaningful and interesting.

Jacobsen: Is meaning externally derived, internally generated, both, or something else?

Tomaiwa: Meaning may be influenced by its surroundings and it may have it’s own. They depend on each other.

Jacobsen: Do you believe in an afterlife? If so, why, and what form? If not, why not?

Tomaiwa: I believe that when our souls are gradually purified by reincarnation, we will be reborn into something higher by the approval of God.

Jacobsen: What do you make of the mystery and transience of life?

Tomaiwa: It is like the dreams you have when you sleep, no matter how happy or sad they are, they will end someday.

Jacobsen: What is love to you?

Tomaiwa:  It is the most precious thing of all.

And love remains long after the death of a loved one.

Bibliography

None

Footnotes

None

Citations

American Medical Association (AMA 11th Edition): Jacobsen S. Conversation with Mizuki Tomaiwa on Life, Work, and Views: Member, OLYMPIQ Society (1). November 2022; 11(1). http://www.in-sightpublishing.com/tomaiwa-1

American Psychological Association (APA 7th Edition): Jacobsen, S. (2022, November 8). Conversation with Mizuki Tomaiwa on Life, Work, and Views: Member, OLYMPIQ Society (1). In-Sight Publishing. 11(1). http://www.in-sightpublishing.com/tomaiwa-1.

Brazilian National Standards (ABNT): JACOBSEN, S. D. Conversation with Mizuki Tomaiwa on Life, Work, and Views: Member, OLYMPIQ Society (1). In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, Fort Langley, v. 11, n. 1, 2022.

Chicago/Turabian, Author-Date (17th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott. 2022. “Conversation with Mizuki Tomaiwa on Life, Work, and Views: Member, OLYMPIQ Society (1).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 11, no. 1 (Winter). http://www.in-sightpublishing.com/tomaiwa-1.

Chicago/Turabian, Notes & Bibliography (17th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott Conversation with Mizuki Tomaiwa on Life, Work, and Views: Member, OLYMPIQ Society (1).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 11, no. 1 (November 2022). http://www.in-sightpublishing.com/tomaiwa-1.

Harvard: Jacobsen, S. (2022) ‘Conversation with Mizuki Tomaiwa on Life, Work, and Views: Member, OLYMPIQ Society (1)In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, 11(1). <http://www.in-sightpublishing.com/tomaiwa-1>.

Harvard (Australian): Jacobsen, S 2022, ‘Conversation with Mizuki Tomaiwa on Life, Work, and Views: Member, OLYMPIQ Society (1)In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vol. 11, no. 1, <http://www.in-sightpublishing.com/tomaiwa-1>.

Modern Language Association (MLA, 9th Edition): Jacobsen, Scott. “Conversation with Mizuki Tomaiwa on Life, Work, and Views: Member, OLYMPIQ Society (1).” In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal, vo.11, no. 1, 2022, http://www.in-sightpublishing.com/tomaiwa-1.

Vancouver/ICMJE: Jacobsen S. Conversation with Mizuki Tomaiwa on Life, Work, and Views: Member, OLYMPIQ Society (1) [Internet]. 2022 Nov; 11(1). Available from: http://www.in-sightpublishing.com/tomaiwa-1

License

In-Sight Publishing by Scott Douglas Jacobsen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Based on work at www.in-sightpublishing.com.

Copyright

© Scott Douglas Jacobsen and In-Sight Publishing 2012-Present. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Scott Douglas Jacobsen, or the author(s), and In-Sight Publishing with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. All interviewees and authors copyright their material, as well, and may disseminate for their independent purposes.

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